Scenery on old highway 15 east of Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico.
Where are Kevin and Ruth right now? Zitácuaro, Michoacán, Mexico.

Where are they going next? Valle de Bravo, Mexico, Mexico.

Friday, December 6, 2019

Mexico RV Caravan Travel Day - Parral to Canutillo

We planned a late start at 10:00am because it was only an 80 km (50 mile) or so drive on relatively straight roads. Everybody in this group is always ready to go ahead of schedule and it seems like it's Ruth and I who are the last ones ready, even though we are also on time!

We were already at the south east corner of Parral, so we didn't have to drive through the city to get out. We were quickly on a nicely paved road heading south towards Durango.

And, another beautiful day. High around 25C (77F).

We weren't on the road for very long when rig #2 Bob and Denise had a lower cargo door fly open. We managed to get everybody pulled over when going through the small town of Matamoros. A municipal police truck pulled in beside us and one guy came to Ruth's side window and the other went to Bob and Denise. They were friendly, and asked to see our vehicle permits. I pointed to the one on the windshield, but he wanted to see the paper one. He asked about the trip and we made some small talk. He hardly even looked at the paper, then wished us a good trip.

Nicely paved road.

Scenery along the way.



Heading down the side road to Canutillo.

Narrow bridge.
I hope it can hold a motorhome!

We arrived at Pancho Villas Hacienda and got parked up. The caretaker tried to get us to go into a back lot, but I tried it and the gate was too narrow. I probably could have squeezed in by folding my mirrors, but there was enough space in the main lot that it wasn't worth the effort.

Canutillo is a sleepy farming community of about 600 people. Ruth got out of the motorhome to guide me back into the parking spot when she was approached by an older woman and given a big hug! Like you would have greeted a relative. She said "welcome to Canutillo, and thanks for visiting!"

We were going to have lunch first, but the caretaker preferred to have us go in the museum right away.

Panch Villa lived here from 1920 until he was killed in 1923.

Heading into the museum.

Surprisingly, the explanations were in both Spanish and English.



Lots of old photos of Pancho Villa.

In the courtyard.

Word traveled fast that there were a group of Gringos in town and we had a steady stream of people waving and saying hello. Then, a guy drives up in a pickup truck selling fish and cheese and dried peppers. We bought some of the cheese.

The group gathered around the guy selling cheese.

After lunch, we went for a stroll around town.

Lots of old ruins.






Vermillion flycatcher.

Local scenery.


Where we are parked.


This woodpecker isn't going to get very far on this concrete pole!

Owenita, Mona, Aron, and Martha.

We were told that there is some kind of religious celebration going on, and that there would be an event at the church around 4:30pm.

Here come the dancers.



I took a video for you... turn up your volume...


Nice coincidence being here when there is something cultural going on with the locals. Once again, everybody is friendly and welcoming.

We had a nice sunset at happy hour...



Today, we have a fairly long drive to the city of Durango. Up early for an 8:00am start!

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10 comments:

  1. The Pancho Villa story is such an interesting one. We stopped at Pancho Villa state park in New Mexico last year and walked across the border for lunch. The SP had a good museum and this one looks really good too. Someday would you share a blog post about how you pre-flight plan your driving routes and the tools you use to navigate? Especially considering the rather spotty cell coverage. I recall you mentioned you don’t rely on paper maps. Or just point me at the relevant post(s) if you’ve already written about this way back when.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, his story is definitely an interesting one. We haven't been to the Pancho Villa State Park but if we are ever in that area we will make sure to stop by and see the museum there.

      This area of Mexico, definitely has a number of museums about him. There was one in the city of Chihuahua that has the car that he was killed in on display but unfortunately it was closed the day we were there. Then there is also one in Parral that we didn't see, just ran out of time. It was at the location where he was killed. Then there was this little one at his hacienda in Canutillo. And another one that we pasted nearby yesterday in the little community of San Juan in the state of Durango where he was born.

      Maybe we can try to do that this summer when we have a little more time. Although really we just use Google maps and street view and the maps.me app. The maps.me app we use off-line so we don't need a cell signal for it. Because we have been on most of these roads before Kevin has a fairly good idea of where we want to go and how he wants to plan our route, he doesn't use any particular website or app for this. I always have a paper map on my lap as we travel along just so I have a "big picture" of our route.

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  2. Interesting the police wanted to see your documentation. There was an article in the local paper saying folks are being returned to the border if they are missing documentation including the FMM. I am enjoying following along.

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    Replies
    1. We are in an area that doesn't get much in the way of foreign tourists and maybe they like to check to make sure people have the correct documentation because they are out of the "free" zone. It is surprising the number of people that don't do the research and realize that they need to have a TIP. We don't blame the police for checking this and for sending people back to the border to get the paperwork done.

      We are glad that you are enjoying our posts and pictures for our trip in Mexico this winter.

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  3. That looks like an interesting town, so nice you were so warmly welcomed.

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    1. It's really not much of a town but the history in the area is very interesting. We love the fact that we are being so warmly welcomed all through this area. :-)

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  4. You shouldn't diss the Woodpecker. he knows the pole was 3' taller before you took his picture....(;+...........
    Nice peaceful quiet town....

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    1. Lol, that's a good one! It's beak must be made out of titanium or something! :-P

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    2. Funny you should mention that, there is in fact a species called the titanium polepecker, native to Mexico. And its beak is particularly striking hehe.

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    3. Yep, that is a totally new species, and we were the first to see it! :-P

      It is actually called an acorn woodpecker, and I don't think it is going to find any acorns on that pole.

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