At the Purcari Winery in the village of Purcari, Moldova. Photo taken December 7, 2016.
Where are Kevin and Ruth right now? Tiraspol, Transnistria...the country that doesn't exist.

Where are they going next? Northern Moldova. Arrive December 11th.

Monday, October 26, 2015

The little town of Guadalcazar

(We went almost 48 hours without internet, so this is our day from October 24th...we'll try and put up another post this afternoon to get caught up!)

Raining on and off when we got up this morning, and if we didn't head further south quickly, we might see some residue from the hurricane. A short drive today though...we only did 136 kms (84 miles).

We stopped at the newly expanded Walmart in Matehuala prior to leaving town. Still stocking up our booze cabinet, so we pick up deals in that category as we see them.

Deal of the day today?

A bottle of "Old Smuggler" Scotch Whisky. Blended from only the finest scotch whiskies in the tradition of the 18th century smugglers. Hmph. The smuggler's had their own traditions. Who knew?

Cost...99 pesos ($8.18 CAD). I've learned that most of these cheap scotches are quite drinkable with a couple of ice cubes.

Mex57 heading south. Lots of clouds, but no rain.

The road from MEX57 to the town of Guadalcazar.

Nice drive, but the road from MEX57 to Guadalcazar is a little slow going. Chris had told us it was fine though, and it was. It was only about 16 kms (10 miles) anyhow. We made it to the town, and parked beside the plaza and went for a walk. Nice little place. We walked over the to municipal police and asked them if we could park for the night. They said that was fine, but they would prefer we were in the second plaza closer to them where they could keep an eye on us. I think we would have been fine where we were, but we moved anyhow.

Camped out at the central plaza in the little town of Guadalcazar. (GPS 22.61741, -100.40006). 

We went for a walk around town and to the two old churches, but they were both locked. Not normal for Mexico, so we're not sure why.

Surprisingly, they had tourist signs...with English on one side!

One of the old churches. 

The entrance to the park. Unfortunately, Sherman would not have fit.

Another angle of the church.

We went to the museum and there was a little lady, Celia, there who tried explaining why the churches were closed, but we didn't understand. She asked if we were going into the museum, and we decided to pay the 15 pesos ($1.25 CAD) each entry fee, since I'm pretty sure we would be her only customers of the day. She read us the rules, that included not taking any photos.

It was a guided tour, and Celia was the guide. She did a really good job of trying to explain things so that we would understand. Almost everything in there dates from the year 1750, and it's all local stuff.

It was hilarious. We would get to a certain item, and her voice would go quiet. She would almost whisper. "If you want, you can take a picture of this...because I like you."

Too funny.

In any other museum, this 250 year old article would be in some kind of glass case.

Neat little museum in Guadalcazar.

The virgin.

We were in there about 45 minutes. Then, she asked us to sign the guest book.

The other church. Shame we couldn't get inside!

Spent the rest of the afternoon reading, playing backgammon, and had a nap.

In the evening, we went for a walk around the plaza. An older guy had set up a music thing with an electronic keyboard and a couple of huge speakers. It was way too loud, but this is Mexico. I'm sure the whole town could hear it. He was still going when we went to bed about 10:30pm, but we think he quit not long after that.

Nice town. If we ever come down and stay in one place for a while without the motorhome I'd like to live in a town like this for a couple of months. The only gringos in town, and you'd have to assimilate. I think that would be a great way to improve our Spanish.

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15 comments:

  1. Following your trip all the way from Steinbach, Manitoba :-) Love reading about your experiences and would love to drive to PV one day

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Happy to hear that you love reading about our adventures and thank you for taking the time to leave a comment, we love hearing from our readers. The drives we have been doing are beautiful but very slow going. A trip to Puerto Vallarta would be much easier and a good place to start for someone new to driving in Mexico.

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  2. I love the your description of Guadalcazar. From the sounds of it, I agree, a great place to hang out for awhile.

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    1. It really is a pretty little town and very clean too! Loved all the old buildings as well. If you like being off the beaten path then this is a good place to go.

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  3. I love these little towns and the interaction with the locals.

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    1. We totally agree, this is the REAL Mexico!

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  4. I don't think any scotch is drinkable...lol
    Beautiful church. Did you ask her...What's not to like? hehe

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    1. I take you you aren't scotch drinkers! ;-)

      No we didn't ask her but I think that she loved the fact that we stopped by for the tour. She was so darn cute!

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  5. You know you are in a rural area when the road traffic is donkeys:) Looks like a cute town.

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    1. Yep, you sure do, along with chickens, cows, pigs and dogs! :-)

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  6. A nice day you had.
    And I have found even the cheapest Scotch is better than the best Rye, but that my opinion and works for me.

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    1. If you are drinking is straight then you are probably right.

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  7. I didn't mention that in Guadalcazar lives a family with a four-hundred year old history. When we were there two years ago at Christmas time they invited us to the party. There were 140 family guests and they came from around Mexico, the U.S. and a couple were living in Europe who were visiting. Truly amazing. And a teacher from our national organization is from there. Glad to hear you stayed and enjoyed it.

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    1. That's what we like so much about Mexico, the people! How many other places would strangers invite you to a party. I can believe the history there, everything seems so old but well taken care of. Thank you so much for suggesting a stop here, we would probably have pasted it by otherwise. We are going to have to make more of a point of going to some of these out of the way places.

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    2. That's what we like so much about Mexico, the people! How many other places would strangers invite you to a party. I can believe the history there, everything seems so old but well taken care of. Thank you so much for suggesting a stop here, we would probably have pasted it by otherwise. We are going to have to make more of a point of going to some of these out of the way places.

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