Ruth, with our friend Andrei at the Orheiul Vechi Historical Complex at Trebujeni, Moldova. Photo taken December 2, 2016.
Where are Kevin and Ruth right now? Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.

Where are they going next? Transnistria. The country that doesn't exist!

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Back to Valle de Bravo

We left the house yesterday morning around 9:30am. Made our way to the Metro station and took a couple of different trains to the Observatorio Terminale de Autobuses. Found our bus line and paid the 130 pesos ($10.40) each for the two hour and fifteen minute ride back to Valle de Bravo.

Our bus didn't leave until 12 noon, so we had an hour or so to wait in the terminal. Had an uneventful ride back, and arrived just after 2:00pm. We had the driver let us off before the town and we just walked the 15 minutes or so to Sherman.

The south western part of Mexico City is really growing. A lot of modern buildings, and more high rises than we saw anywhere else in the city. Here are some photos from the bus window...





It could be that this part of the city has different regulations regarding high rise structures, although we saw none of this type of construction in the northern end of the city, and you would have thought it would have been this way too, so not sure what it is.

Reflections on our visit to Mexico City...

It is absolutely huge. We can't figure how the system can feed these 22 million people grouped so closely together. Imagine the number of eggs that must be produced daily. And yet there are eggs for sale everywhere. And tortillas. And the number of food stalls is incredible. And garbage and waste cleanup. How do they do it? And yet, we were pleasantly surprised that the city is actually cleaner than many of the small towns that we pass through. We've been to Guadalajara and weren't that impressed. Guadalajara seemed to have a huge uncontrolled graffiti problem and that wasn't quite as noticeable in Mexico City, although of course there was some. The metro subway system was cleaner than we've seen in other big cities. The urban transportation system is cheap and efficient. Never once did we feel unsafe or uncomfortable.

We spent a total of 3,000 pesos ($240) during our one week trip to Mexico City, including transportation to and from Valle de Bravo. Many thanks to our www.couchsurfing.org hosts! You made our visit very enjoyable, so thanks for your hospitality and we hope to see you again someday!

10 comments:

  1. Interesting on the high rise buildings, never would have thought Mexico would be a mecca for that anyway. Isn't their largest income the tourists? Maybe I'm wrong. 22 million people. Wow, just can't imagine that, even Los Angeles bothers me a little with the size and numbers.
    But it does look clean there for sure (based on your photos).

    Hope things are good with Sherman!

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  2. I traveled around Mexico in the mid-1980's and based on what I've seen from your travels and photo's, the country has become much more developed and wealthy. It really seems quite different.

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  3. I'm glad to hear you felt safe. My brother-in-law is a priest who was sent to Mexico City to learn Spanish immersion style and while there he was mugged twice. He has traveled all over the world and it is the only time that has happened so I had my fingers crossed for you two the whole time you were there. It may just have been the areas the church had them staying in. I know like most big cities there are areas that are not as safe as most. So glad you had a great trip.

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  4. Thanks for the tour of Mexico city, a real awesome trip.

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  5. I tend to agree with the comment from CAE. Mexico has grown in many ways and most of them good.

    I also have to say that even though we go to D.F. a couple of times a year for work and some pleasure, flying overhead still amazes me. Everything works like Kevin said, the amount of food, water, electricity and the 5 million people who ride the subway everyday. That would be like the whole Monterrey Metro area taking the subway. Mind boggling. Yet it is orderly and tourist friendly. It would be interesting to hear more thoughts from Kevin and Ruth about the Big Tamal.

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  6. Those views from the southern part of the city were more what I was expecting from such a huge city. I'm glad to hear the northern section is different. That's definitely where I would want to be too. $240 for a week in the city is amazing. Lots of folks I know spend that much just for their site in an American RV park.

    Sherry
    www.directionofourdreams.blogspot.com

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  7. You should give classes or write a book on how to do DF for 3000pesos for a week.

    Well done and thanks for all of the tours.

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  8. I have read a lot of books about MX C and it is amazing how well the city functions, in spite of its size. The latest was by David Lida..Mexico City. the Capital of the 21st Century. You are a great communicator and have a great eye for Mexico. Thanks for conveying your travel notes. Cindy Garvin

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  9. Those highrise images are quite the contrast to what you've been sharing from your trip. A modern city with history embedded deep in its roots.

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  10. butterbean carpenterMarch 12, 2012 at 6:20 PM

    WHEW!!!!!!!!! NOW I CAN BREATHE!! Y'all can pull off some of the best stunts(especially with clowns)!! If you know where to go and where NOT TO GO helps a whole lot
    in foreign lands.. Thank you, for the great tour, info & laffs!!! I'm sure Sherman is happy to have y'all back!!
    Looking forward to 'our' next adventure!!!

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